Quickle! It's a Party in a Jar!

It’s Quickle Time!

One of the favorite events we host during Eat Local Week is the Quickle! Quickle is short for quick pickle or refrigerator pickle, and isn’t it fun to say? For a refrigerator pickle, vegetables are preserved using a vinegar-based brine. This is not a shelf stable product and should be stored in the refrigerator and eaten within a month. For best results use locally-grown, organic and fresh-picked produce. The beauty of refrigerator pickles is that you can play with the recipe, mix and match veggies and spices, and just have fun with it! Once you have them made, stick them in the fridge to keep and be ready whenever you get the craving. But remember, this isn’t shelf stable – if you want to learn to can a shelf-stable pickle, follow an approved recipe (www.freshpreserving.com) or come to the Pioneer Park Downtown Farmers Market once a month for the Quickle canning classes to learn how! Now that you know, why not host a quickle this weekend? Don’t forget to tag us at @eatlocalutah  

Quick Pickle Steps

1.Wash and Sanitize Jars 2.Select and wash veggies (think beyond cucumbers for your quick pickle – okra, beans, carrots, tomatoes, chiles, apples, whatever floats your boat and is fresh-picked and local) 3.Cut up your veggies and pack jars tightly 4.Add brine and spices 5.Cover and label jar with date 6.Refrigerate 7.Wait a couple days, then enjoy. Your pickles should last in your refrigerator up to 3 months  

Basic Quickle Ingredients

Pint jars with lids and rings (Mason or Ball canning jars work great, or use any glass jars with non-metallic lids) Fresh veggies or fruits - anything goes, but the harder ones will need to sit longer in your refrigerator to get the full flavor. Softer ones will sometimes wilt. Experiment! It’s all up to your taste. Spices – again, anything goes! Peppercorns, mustard seed, cumin seed, fennel seed, whole cloves, star anise, celery seed, bits of cinnamon sticks, allspice, garlic, crushed red pepper or dried chilies, bay leaves, dried herbs, fresh dill or fennel, etc. Brines - We have 3 basic recipes below to get you started  

Brines 

Asian Brine

1 Cup rice wine vinegar (not seasoned) ½ Cup water Sugar to taste (at least one tablespoon) 2 tsp. pickling salt, or to taste Dash of soy sauce and/or sriracha Combine in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Make sure salt is dissolved. Cool slightly, then pour over veggies. Suggested spices for Asian brine: star anise, fresh or dried chiles, sliced raw garlic, peppercorns, coriander seed, allspice berries, red pepper flakes, fresh Thai basil, cinnamon, cilantro, coriander, cloves, cumin, galangal, ginger, lemongrass, and turmeric.

Basic Sweet Brine

1 part Apple cider vinegar 1 part water Honey, agave, or sugar to taste (don’t use artificial sweeteners) More Water, dilute to taste if less potent brine is desired Pickling salt, to taste Combine in saucepan and bring to a simmer. Make sure sugar and salt are dissolved. Cool slightly, then pour over veggies. Suggested spices for a sweet brine: mustard seed, sliced raw garlic, peppercorns, fennel seed, coriander seed, allspice berries, red pepper flakes, cinnamon, coriander, cloves, ginger, star anise, celery seed. 

Traditional Brine

1 Cup white vinegar Water to dilute as desired Pickling salt to taste Combine in saucepan and bring to a simmer. Make sure salt is dissolved. Cool slightly, then pour over veggies. Suggested spices for a traditional brine: dill seed, mustard seed, celery seed, fennel seed, sliced raw garlic, peppercorns, coriander seed, allspice berries, red pepper flakes.

More in this category: « Meet the Maker: Indulge Eats